Growing up on a cattle farm in rural Georgia, Reid Morris was immersed in country culture. Being the fourth generation in the same farming community, Reid helped plant watermelons with his grandparents on his great grandfather's farm with the same breed of seeds his great grandfather planted, worked on antique cars with his grandfather, headed cattle, fixed fences, and went hunting and fishing. Reid first fell in love with music in church. He recalls singing hymns at a very young age and enjoying how it made him feel. That led to singing along to an Alan Jackson CD in the tractor feeding cows with his dad. Eventually, Reid got a guitar and started taking lessons from the worship pastor at church. He started playing and singing in the church youth band and school talent shows very quickly. By the age of 15, he was playing four hour country sets at local restaurants for tips. As a senior in high school, Reid was making trips to Nashville to write and record his debut EP that was released in 2019. He has now been living in Nashville for two years, where he has been focused on songwriting, released an acoustic EP in 2021, and playing writer's rounds and shows all over Nashville. 

While spending a weekend back home, Reid got together with Noah Hicks on the farm one night to catch up and do some songwriting. After having a conversation about how much they've seen their hometown grow and change through the years, they decided to write about it. They finished half of the song and went back to Nashville. In a songwriting session with Triston Marez, Reid showed the song to Triston and they finished writing it together. Reid says, "The song felt very natural writing it with Noah and Triston because it's a topic that we've all experienced first hand." The cover of the single is a drawing of his great grandfather's barn, drawn by his aunt over 40 years ago before it was torn down. A windmill was added to replicate the windmill that is located behind a shopping center in his home town of Carrollton, Georgia. Then, the city skyline was added to show the city gradually creeping into the countryside.